Speeding-related charges are very prevalent in Lubbock. There are different levels of speeding and fines depending on the speed and how egregious the offense is considered. People who are driving 100 miles per hour in a 65-zone, their fine is going to be really expensive and also the cop is less probably not going to let that person off with a warning even if that is their first ticket ever.

When someone is charged for speeding, the officer typically hands the person a written ticket the moment that they are stopped. However, reckless driving charges typically result in an arrest followed by bond. A Lubbock speeding ticket lawyer can help you determine how to proceed after being handed a ticket. An experienced traffic attorney can help you contest the ticket or speak on your behalf should there be a trial for your case.

Standard Speed Limits

On Texas Tech’s campus, the speed limit is only 20 miles per hour, yet people often get that wrong. They are often stopped on campus. In Lubbock neighborhoods, the standard speed limit is 30 miles per hour. Speed limits on freeways can get up to 65 miles per hour for the freeways that are going through the city. Drivers can be pulled over in Lubbock for going only five miles per hour over the speed limit. A cop can legally stop someone going one mile over the limit if they have been clocked on radar or LIDAR.

Does the Driving Zone Matter to Speeding Cases?

Law enforcement is more likely to care about a school zone than a non-school zone. They are more likely to care about a neighborhood than a farm-to-market road. If someone wants more information on what is considered speeding in their surrounding area, they should contact a Lubbock speeding ticket lawyer.

Contesting an Officer’s Claim

In Lubbock, the law is actually that the limits are set for reasonable speed. This means, if someone is going higher than that speed, receiving a ticket is considered reasonable. A potential defense Lubbock speeding ticket lawyers and a potential client could make is the exact speed they were going was appropriate considering the weather. Proving the weather was clear, the roads were dry and there were not any houses or pedestrians around can show the level of safety the individual considered while driving. If they could see for miles and nobody was driving around near, exceeding the speed limit by two miles per hour is reasonable.

Speeding Ticket Expectations

Driver’s should expect notice of the date must appear at the municipal courthouse. They should expect that the judge and the court will presume that they were speeding and if they have not gotten a speeding ticket in the past 12 months, then they are probably going to let them do deferral on a ticket with a defensive driving course. If someone has gotten a ticket in the past 12 months, they would not qualify for that. They are probably going to ask for a fine or a conviction.

What Penalties can Someone Face?

After getting a speeding ticket, Lubbock speeding ticket lawyers have seen individuals get a conviction on their driving record along with paying a fine of several hundred dollars. That is probably the worst-case scenario. The other things someone can get, though, are some kind of a deferral period where if they don’t get any other ticket, then their speeding ticket can get dismissed after a period of time. Usually during that deferral period, though, the judges can also order someone to take some kind of a class like defensive driving. Sometimes, a ticket can be dismissed without having to go through any kind of a deferral period but that is usually something that an attorney is going to need to negotiate.

Help from a Lawyer

Lubbock speeding ticket lawyers can appear on behalf of a potential client. They can negotiate for a lower fine or they can represent them at trial and advocate on their behalf. The de facto rule is someone should show up for their court date but there are exceptions. If someone is out of the county or secures their ticket ahead of the court date, they can avoid having to appear in court if they can respond by mail to those courts and enter a plea through the mail or, if they hire an attorney, the attorney can appear for them. If someone has not made any contact with the court by the time they are ordered to be in court, then they better be in court or they could get a warrant for their arrest.